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Re: Sendmail Question



On Fri, May 14, 2004 at 01:11:28AM +0200, Alexander Dalloz wrote:
> Am Fr, den 14.05.2004 schrieb -=Brian Truter=- um 00:51:
> 
> > The nocananofy option is in my configuration
> 
> Ok.
> 
> > The nodns option is not accepted when building the sendmail.cf, it says the
> > command is no longer used
> 
> Yes, that's what is stated in the documentation I pointed you to. I did
> not say you should use the FEATURE set.
> 
> I have no knowledge about how UUCP works, but from what I see in the
> sendmail.cf file, the RHS is always added and I actually see no reason
> why this should not happen.

When mail is sent what does the address look like?
Is uucp being used over Ethernet or over serial lines/modems.

You should be seeing a series of bang (!) separated hosts
as uucp passes it from box to box.  Something like:

   From box!decwrl!ucbvax!EW09.NAS.NASA.GOV!rabble Sun Feb 12 18:50:35 PST 1989
   Path: box!decwrl!ucbvax!BOXW09.NAS.NASA.GOV!rabble
   >From: bob BOXW09 NAS NASA GOV ("Big Old Bob")

The bang separated list was generated by a set of tools that 
stars  with a host name and a list of connects-to hosts.
This table is reduced to a routing tree.  You will have to build 
a simple map by hand for now.

If you passing mail via Ethernet go populate /etc/hosts with
things that look like fully qualified host names and assign
private internet IPA addresses.  

Sending/transferring data with uucp via Ethernet (i.e. uusend should
work to test) can bridge between unrouted private nets via hops.  See
also MX record tricks.  i.e. uucp can be used to cut the TCP/IP link
for 'security' and still communicate with the outside world.

 # Here are the IP address ranges that are designated private:
 # see RFC 1918, "Address Allocation for Private Internets"

 #10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255
 #172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255
 #192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255

 192.168.0.50    mars.solar.nocom	mars
 192.168.0.54    earth.solar.nocom	earth

You can also fully qualify a host name on the local host line
with aliases and assign HOSTNAME in /etc/sysconfig/network
to be the C name or alias for localhost (HOSTNAME=mars.solar.nocom)

 127.0.0.1       localhost.localdomain   localhost mars.solar.nocom mars

As long as localhost.localdomain localhost are the first names on the 127.0.0.1 line
it is legal to add aliases (CNAMES).

One of the things that sendmail likes to do is count dots in a host+domain
name.   So a simple "mars" as a host name will not fly.



-- 
	T o m  M i t c h e l l 
	/dev/null the ultimate in secure storage.



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