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Re: --- UPS & BUT ---



On Sat, Sep 16, 2006 at 11:20:24 +0600,
  SERGIE <sgau2006 yandex ru> wrote:
> Guys could you please send me the driver sections from /etc/ups/ups.conf

I am attaching /etc/ups/ups.conf, /etc/ups/upsd.conf, /etc/ups/upsmon.conf
(with a modified password) and /etc/sysconfig/ups.

I am running a develpoment version of nut in the 2.1 series and am using
an MGE Nova 1100AVR w/usb UPS.
# Network UPS Tools: example ups.conf
#
# --- SECURITY NOTE ---
#
# If you use snmp-ups and set a community string in here, you 
# will have to secure this file to keep other users from obtaining
# that string.  It needs to be readable by upsdrvctl and any drivers,
# and by upsd.
#
# ---
#
# This is where you configure all the UPSes that this system will be
# monitoring directly.  These are usually attached to serial ports, but
# USB devices and SNMP devices are also supported.
#
# This file is used by upsdrvctl to start and stop your driver(s), and
# is also used by upsd to determine which drivers to monitor.  The 
# drivers themselves also read this file for configuration directives.
#
# The general form is:
# 
# [upsname]
#       driver = <drivername>
#         port = <portname>
#	< any other directives here >
#
# The section header ([upsname]) can be just about anything as long as
# it is a single word inside brackets.  upsd uses this to uniquely 
# identify a UPS on this system.
#
# If you have a UPS called snoopy, your section header would be "[snoopy]".
# On a system called "doghouse", the line in your upsmon.conf to monitor
# it would look something like this:
#
# 	MONITOR snoopy doghouse 1 upsmonuser mypassword master
#
# It might look like this if monitoring in slave mode:
#
# 	MONITOR snoopy doghouse 1 upsmonuser mypassword slave
#
# Configuration directives
# ------------------------
# 
# These directives are common to all drivers that support ups.conf:
#
#  driver: REQUIRED.  Specify the program to run to talk to this UPS.  
#          apcsmart, fentonups, bestups, and sec are some examples.
#
#    port: REQUIRED.  The serial port where your UPS is connected.  
#          /dev/ttyS0 is usually the first port on Linux boxes, for example.
#
# sdorder: optional.  When you have multiple UPSes on your system, you
#          usually need to turn them off in a certain order.  upsdrvctl
#          shuts down all the 0s, then the 1s, 2s, and so on.  To exclude
#          a UPS from the shutdown sequence, set this to -1.
#
#          The default value for this parameter is 0.
#
#  nolock: optional, and not recommended for use in this file.
#
#          If you put nolock in here, the driver will not lock the
#          serial port every time it starts.  This may allow other 
#          processes to seize the port if you start more than one by 
#          mistake.
#
#          This is only intended to be used on systems where locking
#          absolutely must be disabled for the software to work.
#
# maxstartdelay: optional.  This can be set as a global variable
#                above your first UPS definition and it can also be
#                set in a UPS section.  This value controls how long
#                upsdrvctl will wait for the driver to finish starting.
#                This keeps your system from getting stuck due to a
#                broken driver or UPS.
#
#                The default is 45 seconds.
#
#
# Anything else is passed through to the hardware-specific part of
# the driver.
# 
# Examples
# --------
#
# A simple example for a UPS called "powerpal" that uses the fentonups
# driver on /dev/ttyS0 is:
#
# [powerpal]
#	driver = fentonups
#	port = /dev/ttyS0
#	desc = "Web server"
#
# If your UPS driver requires additional settings, you can specify them
# here.  For example, if it supports a setting of "1234" for the
# variable "cable", it would look like this:
# 
# [myups]
# 	driver = mydriver
#	port = /dev/ttyS1
#	cable = 1234
#	desc = "Something descriptive"
#
# To find out if your driver supports any extra settings, start it with
# the -h option and/or read the driver's documentation.

[ups]
	driver = newhidups
	desc = "bruno.wolff.to"
	port = auto
# Network UPS Tools: example upsd configuration file
#
# This file contains access control data, you should keep it secure.
#
# It should only be readable by the user that upsd becomes.  See the FAQ.

# =======================================================================
# Access Control Lists (ACLs)
#
# ACL <name> <ipblock>
# ACL myhost 10.0.0.1/32
#
# ACCEPT <aclname> [<aclname>...]
# REJECT <aclname> [<aclname>...]
#
# Define lists of hosts or networks with ACL definitions. 
#
# ACCEPT and REJECT use ACL definitions to control whether a host is 
# allowed to connect to upsd.
#
# This default configuration only gives access to localhost.  To allow
# other hosts or networks to connect, see the documentation and change
# these lines.

ACL all 0.0.0.0/0
ACL localhost 127.0.0.1/32

ACCEPT localhost
REJECT all

# =======================================================================
# MAXAGE <seconds>
# MAXAGE 15
#
# This defaults to 15 seconds.  After a UPS driver has stopped updating
# the data for this many seconds, upsd marks it stale and stops making
# that information available to clients.  After all, the only thing worse
# than no data is bad data.
#
# You should only use this if your driver has difficulties keeping
# the data fresh within the normal 15 second interval.  Watch the syslog
# for notifications from upsd about staleness.
# Network UPS Tools: example upsmon configuration
#
# This file contains passwords, so keep it secure.

# --------------------------------------------------------------------------
# RUN_AS_USER <userid>
#
# By default, upsmon splits into two processes.  One stays as root and
# waits to run the SHUTDOWNCMD.  The other one switches to another userid
# and does everything else.
#
# The default nonprivileged user is set at compile-time with
# 	'configure --with-user=...'.  
# 
# You can override it with '-u <user>' when starting upsmon, or just
# define it here for convenience.
#
# Note: if you plan to use the reload feature, this file (upsmon.conf)
# must be readable by this user!  Since it contains passwords, DO NOT
# make it world-readable.  Also, do not make it writable by the upsmon
# user, since it creates an opportunity for an attack by changing the
# SHUTDOWNCMD to something malicious.
#
# For best results, you should create a new normal user like "nutmon",
# and make it a member of a "nut" group or similar.  Then specify it
# here and grant read access to the upsmon.conf for that group.
#
# This user should not have write access to upsmon.conf.
#
# RUN_AS_USER nutmon

# --------------------------------------------------------------------------
# MONITOR <system> <powervalue> <username> <password> ("master"|"slave")
#
# List systems you want to monitor.  Not all of these may supply power
# to the system running upsmon, but if you want to watch it, it has to
# be in this section.
# 
# You must have at least one of these declared.
#
# <system> is a UPS identifier in the form <upsname>@<hostname>[:<port>]
# like ups localhost, su700 mybox, etc.
# 
# Examples:
# 
#  - "su700 mybox" means a UPS called "su700" on a system called "mybox"
#
#  - "fenton bigbox:5678" is a UPS called "fenton" on a system called
#    "bigbox" which runs upsd on port "5678".
#
# The UPS names like "su700" and "fenton" are set in your ups.conf
# in [brackets] which identify a section for a particular driver.
#
# If the ups.conf on host "doghouse" has a section called "snoopy", the
# identifier for it would be "snoopy doghouse".
#
# <powervalue> is an integer - the number of power supplies that this UPS 
# feeds on this system.  Most computers only have one power supply, so this 
# is normally set to 1.  You need a pretty big or special box to have any 
# other value here.
#
# You can also set this to 0 for a system that doesn't supply any power,
# but you still want to monitor.  Use this when you want to hear about
# changes for a given UPS without shutting down when it goes critical,
# unless <powervalue> is 0.
#
# <username> and <password> must match an entry in that system's
# upsd.users.  If your username is "monmaster" and your password is 
# "blah", the upsd.users would look like this:
#
#	[monmaster]
#		password  = blah
#		allowfrom = 	(whatever applies to this host)
#		upsmon master 	(or slave)
# 
# "master" means this system will shutdown last, allowing the slaves
# time to shutdown first.
#
# "slave" means this system shuts down immediately when power goes critical.
#
# Examples: 
#
# MONITOR myups bigserver 1 monmaster blah master
# MONITOR su700 server example com 1 upsmon secretpass slave
MONITOR ups localhost 1 monuser password master

# --------------------------------------------------------------------------
# MINSUPPLIES <num>
#
# Give the number of power supplies that must be receiving power to keep
# this system running.  Most systems have one power supply, so you would
# put "1" in this field.
#
# Large/expensive server type systems usually have more, and can run with
# a few missing.  The HP NetServer LH4 can run with 2 out of 4, for example,
# so you'd set that to 2.  The idea is to keep the box running as long
# as possible, right?
#
# Obviously you have to put the redundant supplies on different UPS circuits
# for this to make sense!  See big-servers.txt in the docs subdirectory
# for more information and ideas on how to use this feature.

MINSUPPLIES 1

# --------------------------------------------------------------------------
# SHUTDOWNCMD "<command>"
#
# upsmon runs this command when the system needs to be brought down.
#
# This should work just about everywhere ... if it doesn't, well, change it.

SHUTDOWNCMD "/sbin/shutdown -h +0"

# --------------------------------------------------------------------------
# NOTIFYCMD <command>
#
# upsmon calls this to send messages when things happen
#
# This command is called with the full text of the message as one argument.
# The environment string NOTIFYTYPE will contain the type string of
# whatever caused this event to happen.
#
# Note that this is only called for NOTIFY events that have EXEC set with
# NOTIFYFLAG.  See NOTIFYFLAG below for more details.
#
# Making this some sort of shell script might not be a bad idea.  For more
# information and ideas, see pager.txt in the docs directory.
#
# Example:
# NOTIFYCMD /usr/local/ups/bin/notifyme

# --------------------------------------------------------------------------
# POLLFREQ <n> 
#
# Polling frequency for normal activities, measured in seconds.
#
# Adjust this to keep upsmon from flooding your network, but don't make 
# it too high or it may miss certain short-lived power events.

POLLFREQ 5

# --------------------------------------------------------------------------
# POLLFREQALERT <n>
#
# Polling frequency in seconds while UPS on battery.
#
# You can make this number lower than POLLFREQ, which will make updates
# faster when any UPS is running on battery.  This is a good way to tune 
# network load if you have a lot of these things running.  
#
# The default is 5 seconds for both this and POLLFREQ.

POLLFREQALERT 5

# --------------------------------------------------------------------------
# HOSTSYNC - How long upsmon will wait before giving up on another upsmon
#
# The master upsmon process uses this number when waiting for slaves to
# disconnect once it has set the forced shutdown (FSD) flag.  If they
# don't disconnect after this many seconds, it goes on without them.
#
# Similarly, upsmon slave processes wait up to this interval for the 
# master upsmon to set FSD when a UPS they are monitoring goes critical -
# that is, on battery and low battery.  If the master doesn't do its job,
# the slaves will shut down anyway to avoid damage to the file systems.
#
# This "wait for FSD" is done to avoid races where the status changes
# to critical and back between polls by the master.

HOSTSYNC 15

# --------------------------------------------------------------------------
# DEADTIME - Interval to wait before declaring a stale ups "dead"
#
# upsmon requires a UPS to provide status information every few seconds
# (see POLLFREQ and POLLFREQALERT) to keep things updated.  If the status
# fetch fails, the UPS is marked stale.  If it stays stale for more than
# DEADTIME seconds, the UPS is marked dead.
#
# A dead UPS that was last known to be on battery is assumed to have gone
# to a low battery condition.  This may force a shutdown if it is providing
# a critical amount of power to your system.
#
# Note: DEADTIME should be a multiple of POLLFREQ and POLLFREQALERT.
# Otherwise you'll have "dead" UPSes simply because upsmon isn't polling
# them quickly enough.  Rule of thumb: take the larger of the two
# POLLFREQ values, and multiply by 3.

DEADTIME 30

# --------------------------------------------------------------------------
# POWERDOWNFLAG - Flag file for forcing UPS shutdown on the master system
#
# upsmon will create a file with this name in master mode when it's time
# to shut down the load.  You should check for this file's existence in
# your shutdown scripts and run 'upsdrvctl shutdown' if it exists.
#
# See the shutdown.txt file in the docs subdirectory for more information.

POWERDOWNFLAG /etc/killpower

# --------------------------------------------------------------------------
# NOTIFYMSG - change messages sent by upsmon when certain events occur
#
# You can change the stock messages to something else if you like.
#
# NOTIFYMSG <notify type> "message"
#
# NOTIFYMSG ONLINE "UPS %s is getting line power"
# NOTIFYMSG ONBATT "Someone pulled the plug on %s"
#
# Note that %s is replaced with the identifier of the UPS in question.
#
# Possible values for <notify type>:
#
# ONLINE   : UPS is back online
# ONBATT   : UPS is on battery
# LOWBATT  : UPS has a low battery (if also on battery, it's "critical")
# FSD      : UPS is being shutdown by the master (FSD = "Forced Shutdown")
# COMMOK   : Communications established with the UPS
# COMMBAD  : Communications lost to the UPS
# SHUTDOWN : The system is being shutdown
# REPLBATT : The UPS battery is bad and needs to be replaced
# NOCOMM   : A UPS is unavailable (can't be contacted for monitoring)

# --------------------------------------------------------------------------
# NOTIFYFLAG - change behavior of upsmon when NOTIFY events occur
#
# By default, upsmon sends walls (global messages to all logged in users)
# and writes to the syslog when things happen.  You can change this.
#
# NOTIFYFLAG <notify type> <flag>[+<flag>][+<flag>] ...
#
# NOTIFYFLAG ONLINE SYSLOG
# NOTIFYFLAG ONBATT SYSLOG+WALL+EXEC
#
# Possible values for the flags:
#
# SYSLOG - Write the message in the syslog 
# WALL   - Write the message to all users on the system
# EXEC   - Execute NOTIFYCMD (see above) with the message
# IGNORE - Don't do anything
#
# If you use IGNORE, don't use any other flags on the same line.

# --------------------------------------------------------------------------
# RBWARNTIME - replace battery warning time in seconds
#
# upsmon will normally warn you about a battery that needs to be replaced
# every 43200 seconds, which is 12 hours.  It does this by triggering a
# NOTIFY_REPLBATT which is then handled by the usual notify structure
# you've defined above.
# 
# If this number is not to your liking, override it here.

RBWARNTIME 43200

# --------------------------------------------------------------------------
# NOCOMMWARNTIME - no communications warning time in seconds
#
# upsmon will let you know through the usual notify system if it can't
# talk to any of the UPS entries that are defined in this file.  It will
# trigger a NOTIFY_NOCOMM by default every 300 seconds unless you 
# change the interval with this directive.

NOCOMMWARNTIME 300

# --------------------------------------------------------------------------
# FINALDELAY - last sleep interval before shutting down the system
#
# On a master, upsmon will wait this long after sending the NOTIFY_SHUTDOWN
# before executing your SHUTDOWNCMD.  If you need to do something in between
# those events, increase this number.  Remember, at this point your UPS is 
# almost depleted, so don't make this too high.
#
# Alternatively, you can set this very low so you don't wait around when
# it's time to shut down.  Some UPSes don't give much warning for low
# battery and will require a value of 0 here for a safe shutdown.
#
# Note: If FINALDELAY on the slave is greater than HOSTSYNC on the master,
# the master will give up waiting for the slave to disconnect.

FINALDELAY 5
# If the UPS is locally attached set it to "yes"
SERVER=yes
# Model of the UPS (filename to call for it, without path)
# Example - one of
#	apcsmart	- APC SMartUPS and similar
#	fentonups	- Fenton UPS
#	optiups
#	bestups
#	genericups
#	ups-trust425+625
#  upsdrvctl
# You MUST change this, or set SERVER to "no"
# To support multiple drivers, set MODEL=upsdrvctl
MODEL=upsdrvctl
# UPS device - needed if UPS is locally attached
#DEVICE=/dev/ttyS0
# Any options to pass to $MODEL
# ex. for my TrippLite UPS, use 
#	OPTIONS="-t 5"
OPTIONS="-a ups"
# Any options to pass to upsd
UPSD_OPTIONS=
#
# [End]

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