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Re: how to access remote CUPS printer?



On Mon, 2006-09-25 at 11:18 -0400, Amadeus W. M. wrote:
> On Mon, 25 Sep 2006 08:01:21 -0500, Aaron Konstam wrote:
> 
> > On Sun, 2006-09-24 at 17:16 -0400, Amadeus W. M. wrote:
> >> On Sun, 24 Sep 2006 16:00:16 -0500, Aaron Konstam wrote:
> >> 
> >> > On Sun, 2006-09-24 at 13:55 -0400, Amadeus W. M. wrote:
> >> >> On Sat, 23 Sep 2006 19:28:35 -0500, Michael Hennebry wrote:
> >> >> 
> >> >> > 
> >> >> > How do I print to a remote CUPS printer
> >> >> > from machines on which I am not root?
> >> >> > On the remote machine, FC5, I am root.
> >> >> > On the clients, FreeBSD and FC3, I am not root,
> >> >> > but can open TCP ports.
> >> >> > Is there a nonroot IPP client that can
> >> >> > be used to print on a remote printer?
> >> >> > 
> >> >> > -- 
> >> >> > Mike   hennebry web cs ndsu NoDak edu
> >> >> > "it stands to reason that they weren't always called the ancients."
> >> >> >                                                       --  Daniel Jackson
> >> >> 
> >> >> 
> >> >> 
> >> >> On the CUPS server you must make the print queues shared. The clients'
> >> >> CUPS will automatically see the shared queues on the network. 
> >> >> 
> >> >> On the server, go to System->Administration->Printing, click on the 
> >> >> queue you want to share, then Edit, etc. 
> >> >> 
> >> >> Oh, and you must have port 631 tcp and udp open on the CUPS server.
> >> >> 
> >> > 
> >> > That is absolutely the wrong way to share printers using CUPS. All printers on the same lan as the server can 
> >> > print to the server's printers by default. No configuration is required.
> >> >> 
> >> > 
> >> > -- 
> >> > Aaron Konstam <akonstam sbcglobal net>
> >> 
> >> 
> >> And exactly why is it absolutely wrong? It works flawlessly on 
> >> my lan. And in fact if I don't make the queues shared on the CUPS
> >> server, they are not automatically seen by the clients. Of course,
> >> I can tell each client separately about the address of the server,
> >> etc. Of course the clients on the lan can print to the server's 
> >> printers by default, if the server tells the lan about its printers.
> >> That is, if the printers are marked as shared on the server.
> >> Am I missing something here?
> >> 
> >> 
> > Well I absolutely should not use the word absolutely so loosely. There
> > is not such a thing as marking a printer as shared under CUPS. That is a
> > construct that system-config-printer has brought over from the pre-CUPS
> > era. The printer server sends out browsing information to all the
> > machines on the lan and the clients become aware of the printers
> > available to them from these browsing messages of printers that are
> > available. 
> 
> So let's not get entangled in semantics. The fedora printer config
> utilities use the term "shared" for all you said above (which is
> correct). 
I should just give up. The printer config utilities that use the term
shared do not properly interact with cups. 
> 
> > If you use the web interface on the clients you will see the
> > printers on the server which have been browsed. All CUPS printers should
> > be configured using the web interface. 
> 
> Says who?
> 
> > No marking printers as shared is
> > necessary.
> > 
> 
> What if I don't want a printer to be seen by some/all clients?
This is a good question aand I need to research a good answer. Right now
all my documentation is boxed up so from memory I am not aware that you
can do this since in cups printers are not shared individually but
collectively.
> 
> The most flexible way to configure the printer is probably by
> editing the config files by hand. At first I thought you were trying 
> to suggest a different configuration of the cups server. I see now
> (as I suspected) that you're only suggesting a different interface
> for configuring the same thing. The interface is off topic here.
> The man wants to know how to print from downtown to his home printer.
> 
> 
> 
--
=======================================================================
Cruickshank's Law of Committees: If a committee is allowed to discuss a
bad idea long enough, it will inevitably decide to implement the idea
simply because so much work has already been done on it.
=======================================================================
Aaron Konstam telephone: (210) 656-0355 e-mail: akonstam sbcglobal net


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