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Re: Ranter or evangelist?



Tim wrote:

>> No application is suggested, even under "Open", to play the damned
>> music.
>
> Not having a populated list of CD player programs, sounds like a Gnome
> problem...

Maybe. Who will write to GNOME? Who's respnsible that things work (TM)?

As I explained to Antonio, Rhythmbox certainly fixed the problem, though.

> Though it could be that you haven't installed any capable
> applications that inform Gnome that they're available as a CDDA handler.

What's the "capable application"? Why isn't the capable application included?

>> If I go to Application, sound and video, the first option,
>> "Audio Player", opens XMMS.
>
> When I've used XMMS, in the past,

Yup, in the past, you too? We're in the present, you know?


> it couldn't directly play CDDA.  It
> needed a plug-in for that.  Though it's probably included by default, by
> now.  It also needed configuration:  It needed you to specify a place on
> the directory tree that it would understand as a reference to your audio
> CD, so that when you accessed that part of the file system, it was to
> read tracks from the audio disc, instead.  This is the same sort of
> thing as I outline further above, but XMMS implementing for itself,
> rather than Gnome acting as the go-between.  This is an XMMS application
> issue, not a Linux one.
>
> Other CDDA capable programs take different approaches.  They'll detect a
> CDDA disc in the CD drive, and provide their own disc/track content
> selector.
>
> Further to this, CDDA programs have (about) two options for playing the
> discs:

(...)
> Naturally, this requires an audio lead
> between your CD and sound card, and lots of modern computers don't have
> one installed.

I suppose that's the problem I had. That's why I had to read the
instructions here:

http://www.spencerstirling.com/computergeek/xmms.html

After this, everything worked. At last, I could see /dev/sr0 !!!

But it seems RhythmBox is aware of this <B>big problem</B> most modern
computers have and it just works without roaming the net to fix it. Don't
you think they take more care than XMMS developers to get this to work?
The page I read dates back to 2005 and the problem is still present...

Honestly, unless the devil himself is at the helm of RhythmBox, I'd stop
fooling around and go for it. I didn't experience a single problem and
never had to roam the net to get it working. So why isn't it the default?
Has the devil something to do with it?

>> At least, normally, you should go to => System, Preference, File
>> Management, Media to select a default CD and DVD player. Still
>> impossible!
>> No option to change anything. I wrote about this. Nobody replied.
>
> Seen this mentioned before, even discussed it with the person, but this
> was prior to Fedora 11 being around.  Nautilus is your file manager for
> Gnome, that's the starting point of fault finding, bug reporting, for
> this issue.

Yes, mentioned before, discussed, maybe bug report filed, prior to Fedora
11, maybe Fedora 9...8, who knows. That's a lot of lost time for many
people, cause you must not be the only one.

How come there's nobody at Red Hat/Fedora <B>responsible</B> for making
reports about this and having things fixed. Playing Jobs, in other words?
You know, kinda: "Will you get this fixed or should we use Thunar... and
XFCE? Will you get XMMS working or will we use RhythmBox? Will you get
Brasero working or... Cause, in the end, you see, everything will work.
You don't work, you're not there."

And the same for documentation. I wrote to this guy at FedoraFAQ to
explain that the instructions for installing the NVIDIA driver weren't
complete. I never heard from him and the page hasn't changed, except,
maybe, a link has been added to NVIDIA's site. (Maybe it was there before
too. I don't remember.) Same for the minimum hardware requirements to
install Fedora on FedoraProject. Despite a bug report, it hasn't changed.

It's a pity to see how we're going nowhere fast, declining all
responsibilities by telling the newbies to RTFM!

>> You think I'm a ranter?
>
> Yes.  And if you do it in the wrong direction, it'll be a useless rant.

Well, I'm trying to evaluate the direction but it's hard. It seems that,
before he was sick, Steve Jobs was reading emails sent by users and
sometimes give a quick answer. Jobs is seen as at the head of Apple, and
you can write to him. If he doesn't read your letter, he'll have somebody
read it. If you don't like teh way his computers work, he has to listen
because he intends to sell you some more. And, man! does he ever sell his
crap!

But here, all you receive as an answer is "File a bug report". Hey, wait a
sec! Doesn't anybody at Fedora use Fedora? How come nobody never noticed
that Brasero doesn't work or XMMS is a pain? Why should we be writing all
the time when, apparently, nobody gives a shit?

I said Fedora was a great distro, and I mean it, but it could be much
better if we stopped pretending that Fedora is only for geeks and made it
work for everybody. The geeks wouldn't lose anything, there's still lots
of fun to be had for tehm.

>> Cause... do you really believe I got any help from local coders for this
>> fight? I got none, absolutely NONE. Why? Cause I'm a ranter. In other
>> words, though I am not a programmer, when I see things that are not done
>> correctly, I say so. They tell me I should fix the bugs.
>
> Most common answer:  What doesn't work for you, is working for them, so
> they cannot fix your particular problem.

Na. As you explained, XMMS doesn't play well with modern hardware and it's
been this way for years.

> Linux is a group affair.  No *one* body makes it work.  It's created and
> maintained by all those interested in working on it.  For those that
> continue to be involved in the project, it does what they want it to do.

Yes, but a distro such as Fedora can set its rules for the software it
will accept.

> If you want it to do something else, you have to get your hands dirty.

> In short, regarding your problems:
>
> Gnome desktop - nothing listed as a handler application for CDDA
> Nautilus - Not interfacing to your chosen CDDA handler.

In short, for my problems:

1) Scrap XMMS, install RhythmBox

2) Scrap Totem, install Mplayer with all the plug-ins

3) Scrap Brasero, install K3B

4) Scrap Nautilus, install Thunar (For the URL bar, but when I went to
/dev/sr0, I was asked which application I wanted to open said file. I of
course entered rhythmbox, and it worked! Not much use, of course, since I
only have to right click the CD icon to open rhythmbox.)

5) Scrap Glipper, install Klipper, though Klipper has bugs in GNOME. I
might give Clipman another try.

6) Etc., etc., etc.,

I have yet to configure Firefox in about:config so that one click in the
url window selects everything. I hope it's still possible. With the
precedent version I had, clicking the icon to the left would do the job.
Not anymore. Those bastards like to make you sweat with every new release!


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