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Re: 3 finger salute gone in F11



Tanel Valdna wrote:
On 07/21/2009 05:58 PM, suvayu ali wrote:
2009/7/21 Gabriel VLASIU <gabriel vlasiu net>:
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On Mon, 20 Jul 2009, suvayu ali wrote:

Is there a way to do this from the command line? I use XFCE and
WindowMaker, I found no way of doing this from XFCE. I could setup a
keyboard shortcut to get this back, but what command do I bind the key
combination to?
cp /usr/share/hal/fdi/policy/10osvendor/10-x11-keymap.fdi /etc/hal/fdi/policy/
reboot


Hi Gabriel,

I did as you suggested, but I still can't kill X by
Ctrl-Alt-Backspace. Any thoughts?

Check your Xorg.conf file.

Find this:

Section "ServerFlags"
    Option "DontZap"  "yes"
EndSection

Change it to "no". And it should work again if you are lucky.


I don't have an xorg.conf. Moreover I thought in fedora DontZap is set to no[1], the problem is the key binding to do that is not turned on
by default. Isn't that right?

Should I be filing a bug report against XFCE for not letting me change
this setting like Gnome or KDE does? What would the appropriate
component be in that case?

[1]http://ryanler.wordpress.com/2009/06/11/controlaltbackspace-shortcut-does-not-restart-the-x-server-in-fedora-11/

The Ubuntu “dontzap” command has no effect on Fedora.

There are two parts to zapping: one is the permission in the server
(Option DontZap) and one is the trigger (the Terminate_Server XKB
symbol). To zap, you have to invoke the trigger and you must be
allowed to zap the server.

In Ubuntu, the server by default does not allow zapping, but the
trigger is in the default keymaps. Thus, to enable zapping it needs to
be enabled in the configuration file (and the server requires a
restart).

In Fedora, the server by default allows zapping, but the trigger is
not in the default keymaps. Thus, to enable zapping it needs to be
enabled in the keymap. This can be done at runtime.

Doing the equivalent to “dontzap -disable” in Fedora explicitly
enables an option that’s enabled by default anyway, so it has no
effect.


--
Suvayu

Open source is the future. It sets us free.


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