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Re: Why is my load ave so high now?



Kevin J. Cummings wrote:
On 07/27/2009 12:04 PM, Bill Davidsen wrote:
Kevin J. Cummings wrote:
Could it be my ivtv0 (PVR-350) board?  Its not supposed to be doing
anything at the moment!  There's nothing plugged into it, and its not
configured under MythTV right now (cable went all digital)....

I'll try removing the driver module and see if that helps.  At worst,
I'll remove the board entirely.

I ended up rmmod ivtvt and ivtvfb, and it didn't help.  Yes, the number
of ints propped noticeably, but the load average remains 10+....

Looking at the original 'top' output, all the CPU was going to nice
processing, presumable SETI. When you kill that you note the load
average is still high, could we see the top few lines again to see the
distribution? I note that hi/si are low, and load average indicates
runable process (my first guess was the seti went threaded). So 'top'
with the 'i' visual option (only show runnable tasks) should show what's
running.

(I learn something new everyday!)

Sure, here it is for "top -i":

top - 12:58:12 up 6 days,  9:02,  4 users,  load average: 11.30, 11.15, 11.10
Cpu(s):  0.7%us,  0.7%sy,  0.0%ni, 98.7%id,  0.0%wa,  0.0%hi,  0.0%si,  0.0%st
Mem:   2074172k total,  1961024k used,   113148k free,   199680k buffers
Swap:  3911816k total,      412k used,  3911404k free,   935716k cached

PID USER PR NI VIRT RES SHR S %CPU %MEM TIME+ COMMAND 14743 root 20 0 2560 1152 836 R 0.7 0.1 0:00.08 top 2506 root 20 0 15068 860 592 R 0.0 0.0 0:32.72 apcupsd 2547 root 15 -5 0 0 0 D 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 nfsd 2548 root 15 -5 0 0 0 D 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 nfsd 2549 root 15 -5 0 0 0 D 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 nfsd 2550 root 15 -5 0 0 0 D 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 nfsd 2551 root 15 -5 0 0 0 D 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 nfsd 2552 root 15 -5 0 0 0 D 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 nfsd 2553 root 15 -5 0 0 0 D 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 nfsd 2554 root 15 -5 0 0 0 D 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 nfsd 17427 root 20 0 77040 72m 752 D 0.0 3.6 0:02.07 clamscan 24904 root 20 0 2492 964 704 D 0.0 0.0 0:01.87 find 28703 root 39 19 1900 652 540 D 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 updatedb

That's the entire top output....

You see a bunch of NFS-related things in a "D" state and you wonder why
it's slow?

If you have processes in an I/O wait (a.k.a. "D") state, that'll bog
stuff down badly...especially if the NFS mounts are mounted "hard".
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