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Re: [K12OSN] /var is full!



There are similar tools available, but you have to have already been using
them :(  Linux has a logical volume manager, but it is not used by
default in most distributions.  You have to have already created your
partitions using the logical volujme manager.

Jon

On Wed, 22 Oct 2003, Julius Szelagiewicz wrote:

> On 22 Oct 2003, Terrell Prude', Jr. wrote:
> > Here's how.
> >
> > Install your hard disk.  We'll assume that it's the second disk on your
> > primary IDE channel, which would make it /dev/hdb.  Go into single-user
> > mode--don't forget to do this, or you will be sorry.  The command for
> > that, as root, is "init 1".
> >
> > 1.)  Partition it as you wish (I use fdisk).  Let's say you make a
> > partition called /dev/hdb1.
> > 2.)  Run mke2fs on it, and throw the -j switch to get journaling (makes
> > it ext3).  I also throw the -v switch (verbose), 'cause I want to see
> > what's happening.
> > 3.)  Mount it somewhere.  I usually make a directory called /mnt/hdb1 to
> > correspond to my actual partition name (in this case, /dev/hda1).  The
> > command for this is "mount -t ext3 /dev/hdb1 /mnt/hdb1".
> > 4.)  Do this copy command:  "cp -Rpv /var /mnt/hdb1" and watch
> > everything copy right over, permissions and all.
> > 5.)  Edit /etc/fstab and change where /var points.  On my Slackware
> > machines, it shows up as /dev/hda4.  On my Red Hat machine, it currently
> > points to /dev/hda3, which shows up as "LABEL=/var".  What you can do is
> > comment out that "LABEL=/var" line and add a new one, like so, again
> > assuming that your new partition is /dev/hdb1:
> >
> >    /dev/hdb1              /var                    ext3
> > defaults        1 2
> >
> > Leave the original line for /var in, but commented, in case you make a
> > mistake.  :-)
> >
> > 6.)  Then, I would recommend rebooting.  You don't necessarily have to
> > (there's a parameter for the mount command that re-mounts w/o
> > rebooting), but I just like to.  This way, I make sure I really did it
> > right and the box will actually survive a reboot.
> >
> > This general procedure works on just about any UNIX, BTW.  I had to do
> > this kind of thing for multiple directories on a HP-UX 11 box and a
> > Slackware box earlier this year.
> >
> > Let us know how it goes.
> >
> > --TP
> >
> > On Wed, 2003-10-22 at 17:57, Richard K. Ingallsl wrote:
> >
> >     Steve Wright wrote:
> >     > On Thu, 2003-10-23 at 10:31, Richard K. Ingalls wrote:
> >     >
> >     >>/my /var is getting full.  when i tried to do an
> >     >>up2date i was told that i didn't have any free
> >     >>space in this partition.  so i moved several files
> >     >>  to a different partition and then i had room to
> >     >>do my up2date.
> >     >>
> >     >>can i increase the size of the partition /var ?
> >     >>OR am i doomed to delete / move files before doing
> >     >>up2date from now on?/
> >     >
> >     > you cannot safely increase the size.  You could add an extra HDD to the
> >     > machine and mount it inside var somewhere.
> >     > /steve
> >     >
> >     ok how do i do that?  (not the installation of the
> >     hard drive, but the mounting part).
>
> Terrel,
> 	your procedure works fine, but since you mention HP-UX 11.x, the
> last time (3 weeks ago) I've run out of space in /var, i just increased
> the logical volume size and the file system size, on the fly. The
> journaling file system (ext3) looks and feels very much like the jfs (aka
> vxfs) on hp. afaik, ext3 is substantially the same same fs that hp calls
> jfs. would you happen to know if similar tools are available?
>
>
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