<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
<head>
  <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type">
</head>
<body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
Sudev Barar wrote:
<blockquote
 cite="mid774593a20801210019y5ed21e28jb179d3ed4aeb44e0@mail.gmail.com"
 type="cite">
  <pre wrap="">On 21/01/2008, "Terrell Prudé Jr." <a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E" href="mailto:microman@cmosnetworks.com"><microman@cmosnetworks.com></a> wrote:
  </pre>
  <blockquote type="cite">
    <pre wrap=""> Sudev Barar wrote:

But this would mean running network cables in parallel for all the
network printers?


 Sure, we run network cables anyway for computers, so it's just like that.
This way, you're far less limited in where you can physically put a printer.
 That is, you're not limited by the length of a USB or LPT cable.

 Perhaps you're thinking that you'd have to run *both* a Cat 5 cable and an
LPT cable?  If so, then the answer is no, you don't.  You can think of this
as a much more brainy sort of "media converter" that turns a printer's
traditional Centronics parallel interface into a Cat 5 network jack that
speaks TCP/IP.
    </pre>
  </blockquote>
  <pre wrap=""><!---->
Okay. Then you need something similar on the other end of the cable or
the printer has to have a network jack (network printer)?
  </pre>
</blockquote>
<br>
The second part of your sentence is actually close to the mark.  That's
what an external JetDirect card, or this little $45 box, does.  It
turns the parallel port on the printer itself *into* a network jack. 
Thus, it turns *any* parallel printer into a network printer.<br>
<br>
--TP<br>
</body>
</html>