<html>
<head>
<style><!--
.hmmessage P
{
margin:0px;
padding:0px
}
body.hmmessage
{
font-size: 10pt;
font-family:Tahoma
}
--></style>
</head>
<body class='hmmessage'>
> So what do we do? Personally, I think there are at least a couple solutions.<br>> <br>> 1)<br>> Spice. The new remote VM technology that is in Fedora 14 and RHEL6.<br>...<br>> 2)<br>> DRBL. This is the route I have taken. It's similar to ltsp boot<br><br>There is also Multiseat/ultra-thin client, and similar ideas, which seem to be growing.  Even lighter systems, cabling, costs and energy than LTSP/thin clients.  The displays are sometimes local to the server via multi-monitors, so no bitmaps-over-lan bandwidth problems with video, games. etc.  It's been adopted quite a bit in Brazil, as has LTSP.   Microsoft launched a multiseat product.  <br><br>http://wiki.c3sl.ufpr.br/multiseat/index.php/Mdm ( <- debian-ubuntu compatible open source )<br><br>http://www.microsoft.com/multipoint/<br><br>http://www.userful.com/products/userful-multiseat-linux<br><br>http://www.ndiyo.org/news<br><br>http://www.thinnetworks.com.br/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=29&Itemid=103<br><br>But thin clients in general seem to be doing fine, similar technologies to LTSP are continuing to do well, all with 
the same local-media-and-devices problems - motion video, audio in/out, 
games-animation-3d, multiple USB local devices, local removable media.  But Linux/Unix has a huge advantage in the shared-memory, X.org, native multiuser, source access, etc. <br><br>Big-fat clients, with tons of video, storage, processing, connectivity, will of course always have advantages.  But growing clouds, distributed-processing, clusters and smartphones seem like huge confirmations that it is far from being the only model any more. <br><br>If anything it seems that LTSP has ever more technologies and directions to choose from and grow towards. <br>                                        </body>
</html>