[Date Prev][Date Next]   [Thread Prev][Thread Next]   [Thread Index] [Date Index] [Author Index]

Re: [Libguestfs] [PATCH] docs: Use F<> for filenames instead of C<>



On Tue, Jul 14, 2015 at 08:58:37AM +0200, Pino Toscano wrote:
> ---
>  src/supermin.pod | 60 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++----------------------------
>  1 file changed, 30 insertions(+), 30 deletions(-)
> 
> diff --git a/src/supermin.pod b/src/supermin.pod
> index f9b7395..53d1b11 100644
> --- a/src/supermin.pod
> +++ b/src/supermin.pod
> @@ -46,7 +46,7 @@ For example:
>  
>  creates a supermin appliance containing the packages C<bash> and
>  C<coreutils>.  Specifically, it creates some files in directory
> -C<supermin.d>.  This directory I<is> the supermin appliance.  (See
> +F<supermin.d>.  This directory I<is> the supermin appliance.  (See
>  L</SUPERMIN APPLIANCES> below).
>  
>  It is intended that the I<--prepare> step is done on a central build
> @@ -60,8 +60,8 @@ builds the full appliance from the supermin appliance:
>  
>   supermin --build --format ext2 supermin.d -o appliance.d
>  
> -This will create files called C<appliance.d/kernel>,
> -C<appliance.d/root> etc, which is the full sized bootable appliance.
> +This will create files called F<appliance.d/kernel>,
> +F<appliance.d/root> etc, which is the full sized bootable appliance.
>  
>  It is intended that the I<--build> step is done on the end user's
>  machine at the last second before the appliance is needed.  The
> @@ -112,7 +112,7 @@ a separate program called C<supermin-helper>.
>  (I<--build> mode only)
>  
>  Copy the kernel (and device tree, if created) instead of symlinking to
> -the kernel in C</boot>.
> +the kernel in F</boot>.
>  
>  This is fractionally slower, but is necessary if you want to change
>  the permissions or SELinux label on the kernel or device tree.
> @@ -124,7 +124,7 @@ the permissions or SELinux label on the kernel or device tree.
>  If specified, search for a device tree which is compatible with the
>  selected kernel and the name of which matches the given wildcard.  You
>  can use a wildcard such as C<vexpress-*a9*.dtb> which would match
> -C<vexpress-v2p-ca9.dtb>.
> +F<vexpress-v2p-ca9.dtb>.
>  
>  Notes:
>  
> @@ -170,7 +170,7 @@ Possible formats are:
>  
>  A directory tree in the host filesystem.
>  
> -The filesystem tree is written to C<OUTPUTDIR> (ie. the I<-o> option).
> +The filesystem tree is written to F<OUTPUTDIR> (ie. the I<-o> option).
>  
>  This is called a C<chroot> because you could literally L<chroot(1)>
>  into this directory afterwards, although it's a better idea to use a
> @@ -183,13 +183,13 @@ assumed that you will be running the appliance using the host kernel.
>  
>  An ext2 filesystem disk image.
>  
> -The output kernel is written to C<OUTPUTDIR/kernel>, the device tree
> -(if using) to C<OUTPUTDIR/dtb>, a small initramfs which can mount the
> -appliance to C<OUTPUTDIR/initrd>, and the ext2 filesystem image to
> -C<OUTPUTDIR/root>.  (Where C<OUTPUTDIR> is specified by the I<-o>
> +The output kernel is written to F<OUTPUTDIR/kernel>, the device tree
> +(if using) to F<OUTPUTDIR/dtb>, a small initramfs which can mount the
> +appliance to F<OUTPUTDIR/initrd>, and the ext2 filesystem image to
> +F<OUTPUTDIR/root>.  (Where F<OUTPUTDIR> is specified by the I<-o>
>  option).
>  
> -The filesystem (C<OUTPUTDIR/root>) has a default size of 4 GB
> +The filesystem (F<OUTPUTDIR/root>) has a default size of 4 GB
>  (see also the I<--size> option).
>  
>  =back
> @@ -210,7 +210,7 @@ The output directory is checked and it is I<not> rebuilt unless it
>  needs to be.
>  
>  This is done by consulting the dates of the host package database
> -(C</var/lib/rpm> etc), the input supermin files, and the output
> +(F</var/lib/rpm> etc), the input supermin files, and the output
>  directory.  The operation is only carried out if either the host
>  package database or the input supermin files are newer than the output
>  directory.
> @@ -248,9 +248,9 @@ B<Any previous contents of the output directory are deleted>, and a
>  new output directory is created.
>  
>  The output directory is created (nearly) atomically by constructing a
> -temporary directory called something like C<OUTPUTDIR.abc543>, then
> +temporary directory called something like F<OUTPUTDIR.abc543>, then
>  renaming the old output directory (if present) and deleting it, and
> -then renaming the temporary directory to C<OUTPUTDIR>.  By combining
> +then renaming the temporary directory to F<OUTPUTDIR>.  By combining
>  this option with I<--lock> you can ensure that multiple parallel runs
>  of supermin do not conflict with each other.
>  
> @@ -262,10 +262,10 @@ Set the configuration file for the package manager.  This allows you
>  to specify alternate software repositories.
>  
>  For ArchLinux, this sets the pacman configuration file (default
> -C</etc/pacman.conf>).  See L<pacman.conf(5)>.
> +F</etc/pacman.conf>).  See L<pacman.conf(5)>.
>  
>  For Yum/RPM distributions, this sets the yum configuration file
> -(default C</etc/yum.conf>).  See L<yum.conf(5)>.
> +(default F</etc/yum.conf>).  See L<yum.conf(5)>.
>  
>  =item B<--prepare>
>  
> @@ -336,8 +336,8 @@ Print the package name and version number, and exit.
>  Supermin appliances consist of just enough information to be able to
>  build an appliance containing the same operating system (Linux
>  version, distro, release etc) as the host OS.  Since the host and
> -appliance share many common files such as C</bin/bash> and
> -C</lib/libc.so> there is no reason to ship these files in the
> +appliance share many common files such as F</bin/bash> and
> +F</lib/libc.so> there is no reason to ship these files in the
>  appliance.  They can simply be read from the host on demand when the
>  appliance is launched.  Therefore to save space we just store the
>  names of the packages we want from the host, and copy those in (plus
> @@ -350,20 +350,20 @@ skeleton base image which contains these files and the outline
>  directory structure.
>  
>  Therefore the supermin appliance normally consists of at least two
> -control files (C<packages> and C<base.tar.gz>).
> +control files (F<packages> and F<base.tar.gz>).
>  
>  =over 4
>  
> -=item B<packages>
> +=item F<packages>
>  
>  The list of packages to be copied from the host.  Dependencies are
>  resolved automatically.
>  
>  The file is plain text, one package name per line.
>  
> -=item B<base.tar>
> +=item F<base.tar>
>  
> -=item B<base.tar.gz>
> +=item F<base.tar.gz>
>  
>  This tar file (which may be compressed) contains the skeleton
>  filesystem.  Mostly it contains directories and a few configuration
> @@ -372,7 +372,7 @@ files.
>  All paths in the tar file should be relative to the root directory of
>  the appliance.
>  
> -=item B<hostfiles>
> +=item F<hostfiles>
>  
>  Any other files that are to be copied from the host.  This is a plain
>  text file with one pathname per line.
> @@ -382,7 +382,7 @@ is created, eg:
>  
>   /etc/yum.repos.d/*.repo
>  
> -would copy all of the C<*.repo> files into the appliance.
> +would copy all of the F<*.repo> files into the appliance.
>  
>  Each pathname in the file should start with a C</> character.
>  
> @@ -392,7 +392,7 @@ However you may drop one or more of these files into the supermin
>  appliance directory if you want to copy random unpackaged files into
>  the full appliance.
>  
> -=item B<excludefiles>
> +=item F<excludefiles>
>  
>  A list of filenames, directory names, or wildcards prefixed by C<->
>  which are excluded from the final appliance.
> @@ -427,9 +427,9 @@ directories passed to it.  A common layout could look like this:
>   supermin.d/zz-hostfiles
>  
>  In this way extra files can be added to the appliance just by creating
> -another tar file (C<extra.tar.gz> in the example above) and dropping
> +another tar file (F<extra.tar.gz> in the example above) and dropping
>  it into the directory, and additional host files can be added
> -(C<zz-hostfiles> in the example above).  When the appliance is
> +(F<zz-hostfiles> in the example above).  When the appliance is
>  constructed, the extra files will appear in the appliance.
>  
>  =head2 MINIMIZING THE SUPERMIN APPLIANCE
> @@ -481,7 +481,7 @@ then you should do something like this:
>  =head2 ENFORCING AVAILABILITY OF PACKAGES
>  
>  Supermin builds the appliance by copying in the packages listed in
> -C<packages>.  For this to work those packages must be available.  We
> +F<packages>.  For this to work those packages must be available.  We
>  usually enforce this by adding requirements (eg. RPM C<Requires:>
>  lines) on the package that uses the supermin appliance, so that
>  package cannot be installed without pulling in the dependent packages
> @@ -497,14 +497,14 @@ If this environment variable is set, then automatic selection of the
>  kernel is bypassed and this kernel is used.
>  
>  The environment variable should point to a kernel file,
> -eg. C</boot/vmlinuz-3.0.x86_64>
> +eg. F</boot/vmlinuz-3.0.x86_64>
>  
>  =item SUPERMIN_MODULES
>  
>  This specifies the kernel modules directory to use.
>  
>  The environment variable should point to a module directory,
> -eg. C</lib/modules/3.0.x86_64/>
> +eg. F</lib/modules/3.0.x86_64/>
>  
>  =item SUPERMIN_DTB

ACK.

Rich.

-- 
Richard Jones, Virtualization Group, Red Hat http://people.redhat.com/~rjones
Read my programming and virtualization blog: http://rwmj.wordpress.com
libguestfs lets you edit virtual machines.  Supports shell scripting,
bindings from many languages.  http://libguestfs.org


[Date Prev][Date Next]   [Thread Prev][Thread Next]   [Thread Index] [Date Index] [Author Index]