<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><div class=""><blockquote type="cite" class="">On Sep 25, 2020, at 4:42 AM, Daniel P. Berrangé <<a href="mailto:berrange@redhat.com" class="">berrange@redhat.com</a>> wrote:<br class=""><br class="">IOW we could stuff both the hyper-v  major + minor version digits<br class="">into the libvirt major digits. Then we can split the hyperv micro<br class="">digits across the libvirt minor + micro.<br class=""><br class="">ie pack it using<br class=""><br class=""> version = (major * 100,000,000) + (minor * 1,000,000) + micro<br class=""><br class="">If any libvrt apps are trying to reverse parse this and turn it<br class="">back into dotted values, it is going to look wierd, but at least<br class="">we won't be discarding information.<br class=""></blockquote><br class="">I wrote this up and examined the `virsh version` output for several <br class="">Windows/Hyper-V versions.<br class=""><br class="">For Windows Server 2016 that I previously mentioned, its version number <br class="">is 10.0.14393. `virsh version` displays it as 1000.14.393.<br class=""><br class="">The first version of Windows that supported Hyper-V is Windows Server <br class="">2008. Its version number is 6.0.6001, which `virsh version` displays as <br class="">600.6.1. Would you prefer it to visually preserve more of the “6001”, and <br class="">produce 600.600.1 as the result?</div></body></html>