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Re: Latest UTB Newsletter



On Fri, 2003-03-14 at 16:13, Brent Fox wrote:
> On Wed, 2003-03-12 at 22:02, Philip Wyett wrote:
> > On Wed, 2003-03-12 at 20:58, Brent Fox wrote:
> > > On Wed, 2003-03-12 at 14:41, Jesse Keating wrote:
> > > > On Wednesday 12 March 2003 11:25, Brent Fox wrote:
> > > > > The Enterprise line and the changes to the support level of the consumer
> > > > > line will allow the consumer line to move faster than in the past.  This
> > > > > will help us address one of the most common criticisms of Red Hat Linux
> > > > > over the years, which is that we aren't as cutting edge as some of the
> > > > > other distros.  
> > > > 
> > > > Unfortionatly, a lot of us loved Red Hat because they weren't so bleeding 
> > > > edge, and we didn't have near as many problems w/ Red Hat's GPL releases as 
> > > > we did with various other distributor's GPL releases.  I really hope that the 
> > > > level of QA that went into GPL releases in the past will not drop.
> > > 
> > > We won't drop the level of QA.  If we neglect the QA on the consumer
> > > line, it will only make the job of stabilizing the next Enterprise
> > > release that much harder.  QA works best when it's a part of the process
> > > of developing software as opposed to something you do just before you're
> > > ready to ship.
> > > 
> > 
> > I can live with the enterprise versions, but there's a really bad
> > perception building here through Red Hat PR and comment that users of
> > the consumer Red Hat Linux sole purpose is as a proving ground for the
> > enterprise range and the corporates. :/
> 
> Red Hat Linux has always been a proving ground.  Previously, each
> version was a proving ground for the next version.  That's still true,
> but now it's also a proving ground for the Enterprise line.  
> 

Thanks for the clarification.

> Think of it like CVS.  Our build system is like CVS head, where all the
> new code is checked in and compiled.  Every six months, we basically
> take a snapshot of the latest tree and start stabilizing it internally. 
> Then we do one or more public betas.  After we feel it's ready for
> public consumption, we make a release of Red Hat Linux.  Our releases
> have worked this way for years and this has not changed.  I did say that
> the consumer line will move faster now, but that doesn't mean that we're
> going to ship alpha-quality code.  
> 

I never thought for a second that with any increase in release pace to
newer OSS versions, that Red Hat would sacrifice stability to be more
bleeding edge in the consumer version.

> What has changed is that now every 12-18 months, we take a snapshot that
> will become an Enterprise release.  It will have a longer beta cycle so
> that our partners (Oracle, Veritas, etc.) can run their stress tests and
> such.  In the past, vendors like Oracle didn't even have time to run
> their stress tests and give us feedback because the beta cycle for Red
> Hat Linux is usually only about three months long.  This additional
> testing will allow us and our partners to support the product for a much
> longer period of time than the consumer line.  
> 

All this talk of release cycles does bring one thing to the fore though.
Do Red Hat see anytime soon where it will move away from a 6 monthly
release schedule for the consumer version, to say 12 months and offer
slightly longer support on it? Just from a purely personal perspective,
I would like to see this.

> So that's a pretty high-level view of our process, but I hope it
> explains that we haven't fundamentally changed how we do things.  
> 

Yes it does explain things and I appreciate you taking the time todo so.

Regards

Phil

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